International Journal of English Research

International Journal of English Research


International Journal of English Research
International Journal of English Research
Vol. 2, Issue 6 (2016)

Double Edge to Immigration in Uma Parameswaran’s plays (Sons must die and Rootless but Green are the Boulevard Tree)


Dr. Lakhwinder Singh Gill

Uma Parameswaran is one of those playwrights who have migrated from India to other country but India continues to live in their thoughts. Whether it is Sons Must Die or Rootless but Green are the Boulevard Trees, India dominate Uma Parameswaran’s vision as a playwright. In Sons Must Die the reference is to Kashmir, the Indian region, where thousands of lives are lost but there is no visible solution to its problem yet. The playwright is of the view that the Kashmir issue may be taken from any angle, but the fact remains that the youth is dying – whether one dies as a terrorist or as a soldier it is the loss of India. This loss of the sons of India perturbs the playwright sitting in Canada. On the other hand, Rootless but Green are the Boulevard Trees refer to the Indians who have migrated to India with the hope of better future. Physically they have left India but psychologically they could not. As a result, metaphorically speaking, their leaves may look green but, in fact, they are rootless. First generation that migrated with the hope of bright future of their sons and daughters are caught between two different cultures- Indian culture which they cannot leave and Canadian culture which they cannot adopt. This clash of two cultures tortures them: Indians they are not now, Canadians they cannot be.
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How to cite this article:
Dr. Lakhwinder Singh Gill. Double Edge to Immigration in Uma Parameswaran’s plays (Sons must die and Rootless but Green are the Boulevard Tree). International Journal of English Research, Volume 2, Issue 6, 2016, Pages 29-31
International Journal of English Research