International Journal of English Research

International Journal of English Research


International Journal of English Research
International Journal of English Research
Vol. 3, Issue 4 (2017)

Importance of culture and tradition in Manju Kapur’s “Difficult daughters”


M Geetha

Indian women caught between two cultures, doubly alienated, lead a marginal existence that take them nowhere. The conflict between their loyalty to a dominant tradition and their compelling need to break through the conventional barrier has left Indian women in a double framework of mind where feelings of doubt and isolation, and feelings of conviction and assertion, alternate with each other. Here they face unprecedented rootlessness and alienation which leads to a severe identity crisis. Modern women who are basically existentialists, move in accordance with their own personal rhythm and enter realms that lie beyond social sanction. Their journey to self-hood follows the lines of their natural evolution as a person. These women represent a new consciousness. They refuse to live in the traditional role of a meek housewife. Their intellectual passion itself seems unorthodox and threatens male supremacy. To them self-fulfillment is an attainable dream. These women preserve their integrity and fulfil their need to exist as individuals in a society that still operates on a system of patriarchal conventions. The image of women in Indian novels has undergone a change in the last three decades. Throughout this period, women writers have moved away from traditional enduring, self-sacrificing women toward conflicted female characters searching for identity. The interests of women writers have changed with Indian society and its relationship with the West. Traditionally, marriage for women has entailed a most submissive feminine role. Although a woman ideally had power as a mother, as a wife she submitted to her husband and his family. Only recently have Indian women in the dominant patriarchal tradition started to question aspects of this role, or decided against marriage altogether. In Image of Woman in the Indo Anglian Novel, Meena Shirwadkar claims that, following the changes in Indian society, novels have started to progress from depicting women characters solely as epitomes of suffering, womanly virtue to portraying more complex, real characters: “Tradition, transition and modernity are the stages through which the woman in Indo-Anglian novel is passing.
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How to cite this article:
M Geetha. Importance of culture and tradition in Manju Kapur’s “Difficult daughters”. International Journal of English Research, Volume 3, Issue 4, 2017, Pages 66-67
International Journal of English Research